Happiness is not a possession to be prized, it is a quality of thought, a state of mind. — Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca (via bookmania)
All of this is typical girl-fear. Once you realize that The Exorcist is, essentially, the story of a 12-year-old who starts cussing, masturbating, and disobeying her mother—in other words, going through puberty—it becomes apparent to the feminist-minded viewer why two adult men are called in to slap her around for much of the third act. People are convinced that something spooky is going on with girls; that, once they reach a certain age, they lose their adorable innocence and start tapping into something powerful and forbidden. Little girls are sugar and spice, but women are just plain scary. And the moment a girl becomes a woman is the moment you fear her most. Which explains why the culture keeps telling this story.

Rookie, The Season of the Witch

For readings on the correlation in horror between puberty and the monstrous, see:

(via bluntlyblue)

(via songsofwolves)

SFGate:

The 11th Avenue resident in Oakland’s Eastlake neighborhood was simply feeling hopeful in 2009 when he went to an Ace hardware store, purchased a 2-foot-high stone Buddha and installed it on a median strip in a residential area at 11th Avenue and 19th Street.
He hoped that just maybe his small gesture would bring tranquillity to a neighborhood marred by crime: dumping, graffiti, drug dealing, prostitution, robberies, aggravated assault and burglaries.
What happened next was nothing short of stunning. Area residents began to leave offerings at the base of the Buddha: flowers, food, candles. A group of Vietnamese women in prayer robes began to gather at the statue to pray.
And the neighborhood changed. People stopped dumping garbage. They stopped vandalizing walls with graffiti. And the drug dealers stopped using that area to deal. The prostitutes went away.
I asked police to check their crime statistics for the block radius around the statue, and here’s what they found: Since 2012, when worshipers began showing up for daily prayers, overall year-to-date crime has dropped by 82 percent. Robbery reports went from 14 to three, aggravated assaults from five to zero, burglaries from eight to four, narcotics from three to none, and prostitution from three to none.
"I can’t say what to attribute it to, but these are the numbers," a police statistician told me.

SFGate:

The 11th Avenue resident in Oakland’s Eastlake neighborhood was simply feeling hopeful in 2009 when he went to an Ace hardware store, purchased a 2-foot-high stone Buddha and installed it on a median strip in a residential area at 11th Avenue and 19th Street.

He hoped that just maybe his small gesture would bring tranquillity to a neighborhood marred by crime: dumping, graffiti, drug dealing, prostitution, robberies, aggravated assault and burglaries.

What happened next was nothing short of stunning. Area residents began to leave offerings at the base of the Buddha: flowers, food, candles. A group of Vietnamese women in prayer robes began to gather at the statue to pray.

And the neighborhood changed. People stopped dumping garbage. They stopped vandalizing walls with graffiti. And the drug dealers stopped using that area to deal. The prostitutes went away.

I asked police to check their crime statistics for the block radius around the statue, and here’s what they found: Since 2012, when worshipers began showing up for daily prayers, overall year-to-date crime has dropped by 82 percent. Robbery reports went from 14 to three, aggravated assaults from five to zero, burglaries from eight to four, narcotics from three to none, and prostitution from three to none.

"I can’t say what to attribute it to, but these are the numbers," a police statistician told me.

The paradox of education is precisely this - that as one begins to become conscious one begins to examine the society in which he is being educated. — James Baldwin (via whitecolonialism)

(via strandedstmarkscitylights)

fuckyeahneedlework:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

 faig ahmeds Embroidered Art 

When you think of traditional carpets from Azerbaijan, the thought of contemporary art does not quickly spring to mind… but these beautiful, and modern works will change that. Faiq Ahmed, a native of the Eurasian nation, has taken his countries old-school art form and brought it beautifully into the current era, deconstructing the ancient process of weaving and adapting it to todays contemporary art forms.

Oh….Oh, my.

(via diglettdevious)

nprbooks:

The MacArthur “genius grants” were announced just after midnight. Winners include cartoonist and graphic memoirist Alison Bechdel, playwright Samuel D. Hunter, translator and poet Khaled Mattawa and poet Terrance Hayes.

Alison Bechdel was commended for “expanding the expressive potential of the graphic form in intricate narratives that explore the complexities of familiar relationships.” Bechdel’s comic strip, Dykes to Watch Out For, ran from 1983 to 2008. “The characters in my comic strip … are all thinly veiled versions of myself,” she told the MacArthur Foundation. “No matter what they look like … they’re all basically me.” Her memoirs include Fun Home, about her father, which she talked about  with Liane Hansen in 2006, and a book about her mom titled Are You My Mother?, which she discussed with Guy Raz in 2012. In a Q&A with NPR on Tuesday, she said:

"I guess I’m proudest of just really sticking with this odd thing I loved and was good at — drawing comics about marginal people (lesbians) in a marginal format (comics). I never thought much about whether that was responsible, or respectable, or lucrative."

Khaled Mattawa was recognized for “rendering the beauty and meaning of contemporary Arab poetry accessible to an English reader and highlighting the invaluable role of literary translation in bridging cultural divides.” He says he finds it “moving and rewarding” to connect poets and readers who otherwise would not have been connected. “There were many great Arab poets who were not available in English, so it seemed important for me to bring them to the American reader,” Mattawa told the MacArthur Foundation. Mattawa spoke with NPR back in February 2011 about his birthplace, Benghazi, Libya, which had just seen an uprising against the regime of Moammar Gadhafi. He told Guy Raz:

“I feel rebirth, greatly honored to be from Benghazi. I feel slightly ashamed at having distrusted the people or my fellow citizens at not being able to rise. And I feel a great sense of solidarity with the people of my city. I’m overjoyed.”

Terrance Hayes was recognized for “reflecting on race, gender, and family in works that seamlessly encompass both the historical and the personal and subvert canonical forms.” Tune in to All Things Considered tonight to hear Melissa Block’s conversation with Hayes. “I’m pursuing a kind of language which is just as complicated and just as transparent as human experience,” he told the MacArthur Foundation. NPR featured Hayes’ poem “The Blue Terrance” back in 2006.

Samuel D. Hunter was commended for “quietly crafting captivating dramas that explore the human capacity for empathy and confront the socially isolating aspects of contemporary life across the American landscape.” Drawing inspiration from his Idaho hometown, Hunter says his plays are an “experiment in empathy.” He tells the MacArthur Foundation: “The plays are very plainspoken. I’m not interested in making a kind of art that goes over anybody’s heads. … I want them to be accessible.”

Clockwise from top left: Alison Bechdel, Samuel D. Hunter, Terrance Hayes and Khaled Mattawa. Images Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

aceofheartsu:

I CANT BREATHE

aceofheartsu:

I CANT BREATHE

(via spellboundsama)

idrawnintendo:

Been thinking about Skull Kid and Majora’s Mask. The more I think about it, the more I realize what a wonderful game it really is in context of the series. It’s a game about alienation, loneliness and the importance of friendship, and in its own strange way it just may be the saddest and most personal Zelda game.

idrawnintendo:

Been thinking about Skull Kid and Majora’s Mask. The more I think about it, the more I realize what a wonderful game it really is in context of the series. It’s a game about alienation, loneliness and the importance of friendship, and in its own strange way it just may be the saddest and most personal Zelda game.

(via valley-of-frosting)

Just had a riveting twitter conversation about Grave of the Fireflies (and My Neighbor Totoro) and I think it is the most substantial step I have ever taken in overcoming the emotional trauma that was that movie. Thanks clefairydance for being so knowledgeable about Ghibli and Japanese history, and for being such an observant viewer and keen conversator!

thedailydoodles:

"Comfiest at Home"
Even though it’s Saturday night, and everyone is outJanel doesn’t get what all the fuss is aboutShe hurries back from work, gets her home-clothes onAnd prepares to party by herself, from midnight till dawn.
With a strong internet connection and plenty of books on the shelf,Janel can come home and just be herself.No need for the hassle of her stupid friend’s egos,Because she has hours of illegally downloaded movies and shows.
She can listen to music while relaxing in her bed,Or maybe post pics on her blog of pretty people who are dead.There’s enough food in her fridge to last her the entire weekend,So Janel can just stay inside, where she doesn’t have to pretend.
She wishes them well, those who feel the need to join packs and roamBut Janel has always been comfiest, when she can just have fun at home.
Originally Posted 1-5-2013
(Starring the Awesome Janel Vaughan of spacytigre.tumblr.com!)
Wanna appear in your very own Daily Doodle?  CLICK HERE!FAQ  TWITTER  FACEBOOK  SOCIETY6

thedailydoodles:

"Comfiest at Home"

Even though it’s Saturday night, and everyone is out
Janel doesn’t get what all the fuss is about
She hurries back from work, gets her home-clothes on
And prepares to party by herself, from midnight till dawn.

With a strong internet connection and plenty of books on the shelf,
Janel can come home and just be herself.
No need for the hassle of her stupid friend’s egos,
Because she has hours of illegally downloaded movies and shows.

She can listen to music while relaxing in her bed,
Or maybe post pics on her blog of pretty people who are dead.
There’s enough food in her fridge to last her the entire weekend,
So Janel can just stay inside, where she doesn’t have to pretend.

She wishes them well, those who feel the need to join packs and roam
But Janel has always been comfiest, when she can just have fun at home.

Originally Posted 1-5-2013

(Starring the Awesome Janel Vaughan of spacytigre.tumblr.com!)

Wanna appear in your very own Daily Doodle?  CLICK HERE!
FAQ  TWITTER  FACEBOOK
  SOCIETY6

sparkydapenguin:

Can we talk about Flula’s hashtag game?

(via a-hobbitatheart)